Saturday, 17 March 2012

Margaret to Tom 15.3.1942

15th March 1942



Thank you for the lovely week end. I'm sorry you had to leave so early, but I suppose you would have gone by now if you had caught the later train. But, as I think of the last weekend we had together, at this time we were sitting listening to our records. Anyway, no doubt, late nights and a sleepless one would do you no good – let's hope you will be nearer home next time. Let me know as soon as possible about Easter won't you. I am looking forward to it, and by the way, I hope you have written to Bob so we can enjoy our Easter holiday better.
Well I do hope you had a good journey back and a decent seat and that there were no mishaps this time.
At the moment Daddy is reading "Cranford" and as you can probably guess, although he only started it this evening, he is half way through it.
I have nothing much to say tonight, except our lovely weekends go all too quickly & I'm looking forward to Easter ever so much, but roll on summer and bring that honeymoon as quickly as possible & Lynmouth and all those lovely sleepless? or peacefully snuggly nights.
I will finish this tomorrow at the office so goodnight darling,,

All my love,
Margaret

Monday morning
I very nearly stayed at home to look after Mother today as my cold is not too good, however, Mother said if, I stayed she would get up & put me to bed, so that was that. Anyway I shall probably feel alright tomorrow. I'm sucking those Jilps (?) (lozenges?) periodically. I went to bed at 9.30 pm last night, so you can guess how tired I must have felt. I went straight off to sleep. Mother said she thought I would crack up immediately you had gone. I don't know if it is that or if it's just the normal course of the cold. What I do know is that I have a horrible pain in my back and not in the lumber region.
Mrs Harding and her husband are coming along tomorrow all being well.
The sirens have just gone 11.20 am. Isn't it unusual? I wonder if this is a false alarm or if the invasion has really started. Anyway all is quiet at the moment. It's very cloudy so no wonder the planes are probably seeking refuge behind the clouds.
This has quite put me off my stroke. We have been dusting tin hats & digging out gas masks, so perhaps it is just as well this came to wake us up. There is certainly nothing happening at the moment, though perhaps they are round south London. I do hope this is not another series of many raids. I'm sure we would not exist through another lot. I think I shall find my way down to Swansea before long.
I had a funny dream last night. I dreamt Ethel and I took the afternoon off to go back to school. Norman Steers was the headmaster and funny old women for teachers. I wondered exactly how we were going to work in the office as well, because I felt sure they could not spare me every afternoon. However, Ethel came & asked one day if I had seen the papers which said all civil servatns were to be called up. Anyway I said, "well that settles it, I shall have to be married in my costume afte rall"
The all clear has just gone 11.40. I am thankful for that.
All my love,

Margaret

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